Miracle or “Bleach”? The New Autism Cure Scam!

Miracle Mineral Solution, popularly known as MMS among various online circles, is being sold in huge volumes, claiming that it is a cure for autism. However, it is important to know that the solution is dangerous to consume as the majority of its contents are bleach.

autism treatment scam
Hey scammer! Bleach doesn’t cure Autism

Emma Dalmayne, an activist and an autism campaigner, says “Children end up on very restricted diets when parents follow MMS protocol.” Certain foods such as citrus are banned as they tend to deactivate MMS.

Gluten, sugar or casein is advised against. MMS can be given in doses of up to 40 drops in 8 oz of purified water.

She warns the public, saying the solution contains 28% sodium chlorite—bleach that is used in water treatment processes to strip raw textiles into finished goods.

Dalmayne further adds that the substance is a highly dangerous one, the consumption of which has resulted in fatality of a woman called Sylvie Nash. The miracle bleach causes severe damage to red blood cells when ingested on a regular basis. “MMS can cause serious damage to health and in some cases even death,” says a spokeswoman for the Food Standards Agency (FSA). “Anyone who has bought these products is advised to throw them away.”

Dalmayne has two lovely kids who are on the autism spectrum and is herself diagnosed with autism. The mother says she became fully aware about the fake cures circulating during early 2014 and has been actively participating in the effort to help others. She says, “Parents would ask me, ‘have you seen this?’ ‘Isn’t it awful?’ or, ‘Does it work?’”

Dalmayne further adds that she has uncovered many websites that sell MMS products and sell the product under the guise of an autism cure. She further identifies GcMAF, another product that is not approved by the health authorities that individuals sell and promote as a cure that treats HIV and autism.

The authorities are also concerned about the rising menace of fake cures and are unable to arrive at a figure describing how widespread the usage of fake cures is or the intensity of the manufacturing that is taking place in the U.K. alone. Many activists are aggressively campaigning and unearthing many such cases and bringing them to the attention of FSA.

The Healthcare Regulatory Agency has also given a confirmation about its ongoing role about the different investigations it carries out on a regular basis to weed out fake manufacturers. The authorities are presently investigating GcMAF products after finding the manufacturing conditions of the companies unacceptable and the products unsuitable for human consumption.

More than 10,000 kits of GcMAF have been seized by the authorities from their production site in Milton, Cambridgeshire. The products were being marketed through a plethora of online and offline campaigns and were majorly targeted towards citizens of the U.K.

The National Autistic Society (NAS) has also warned the general public about MMS and GcMAF companies. These companies sell the products by promoting them aggressively through well-designed campaigns.

Sarah Lambert, NAS’s head of policy, says “Not only is there no verified scientific evidence for these so-called cures, but any autistic adult or child using them risks serious harm.”

Carol Povey, director of NAS’s Centre for Autism, says “We know how difficult life can be for families affected by autism, particularly just before and after diagnosis when there’s so much uncertainty and, in some cases, no understanding or support from public services and people around them. Some families end up feeling so isolated and disillusioned that they’re desperate for anything that might help, which can leave them vulnerable to the dangerous claims of quacks and charlatans.”

Dalmayne is campaigning for a legislation which she hopes would ban marketing of fake products that come with impossible taglines.

“This is child abuse. It’s happening in the U.K. right now,” she says.

What is your take on this rising menace of fake cures? Have you come across any of these? Do share your thoughts in the comments section below so that every one of us can be aware and take a step together towards a greener society.

Summary
MMS Miracle Cure a major Scam
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MMS Miracle Cure a major Scam
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Children are made to consume bleach in the name of a Miracle cure for Autism
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AutisMag
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